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Tips for Traveling With a Chronically Ill Friend or Relative

Traveling with a chronically ill friend or relative can be difficult, but with a little bit of preparation it can be a lot easier....

Traveling with a chronically ill friend or relative can be difficult, but with a little bit of preparation it can be a lot easier. Some tips to keep in mind are to double check flight dates and times, maintain normal daily schedules as much as possible, and communication is key. If help is needed, don’t be afraid to ask for it.

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When traveling with a chronically ill friend or relative, it is important to follow the medical advice of their doctor. This means staying on top of medication schedules, packing all necessary supplies, and being aware of any potential risks. Additionally, it’s important to acknowledge local healthcare resources wherever it is you’re traveling, just in case your friend or relative needs assistance. Someone traveling through New York City, for example, might take note ofRichmond Health Network – Internal Medicine in Staten Island, NY as a precaution.

Make a budget and stick to it.

Traveling is a costly pastime and traveling with chronic illness (as with life with chronic illness) comes with even greater expenses. Those medications, supplements, doctor’s visits, and other necessities don’t pay for themselves! Whether you need to seek urgent medical care while on your trip or you’re simply accommodating your loved one’s chronic illness in general, you’ll want to find ways to make your trip more affordable. A resource like Travelin’ Coupons can help you take advantage of discounts and coupon codes for must-see attractions or that perfect hotel room.

Pack their medication.

If your friend or relative is on medication, make sure to pack an adequate supply, along with instructions on how to take them. If your friend or relative needs to use an inhaler or other medical device, be sure to pack it as well. It is also important to pack a list of the doctor’s contact information, as well as information on the nearest hospital.

Stick to a routine when possible.

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If you have a chronically ill friend or relative, maintaining normal daily schedules as much as possible is important. This means keeping to a routine as much as possible, including eating on a regular schedule and getting plenty of rest. While it may not always be possible to stick to a strict routine while traveling, try to keep as close to it as possible. This will help your friend or relative stay as comfortable as they can be.

Learn about their condition.

It is also important to familiarize yourself with the chronic illness (or illnesses—many conditions bring others along for the ride) your loved one is living with. This will help you better understand what they are going through and how you can best support them while on your trip. A good place to start is by checking out credible online resources—your traveling companion might even share such resources on social media for their friends and family. Of course, you can always ask them questions, too. They’ll be touched that you’re putting in the effort to better understand what they go through.

Be as understanding as you can.

When traveling with a friend or relative who has a chronic illness, it is important to be patient and understanding. They may not be able to do everything that you want to do, and may need more rest than you’d take for yourself. Try to relax and enjoy your trip together, and know that your friend or relative will appreciate your effort to make their trip as comfortable as possible.

By following the medical advice of their doctor, being aware of the risks, preparing accordingly, and doing your research, you can help ensure a safe and enjoyable trip for you and your friend or relative.

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Hometown: Lisbon, Portugal

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The best kept travel secrets all in one place.

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