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The Best Indoor Austin Temperature for Each Season

While Texas is known for over 300 days of sunshine, it still has four seasons in which temperatures vary quite a bit. Summers in...

While Texas is known for over 300 days of sunshine, it still has four seasons in which temperatures vary quite a bit. Summers in Austin are hot, muggy, and humid. Temperatures can go up to 97 degrees Fahrenheit in the summer, so expect the heat to be sweltering. Meanwhile, winters tend to be windy, dry, and cold. Temperatures can go all the way down to 37 degrees Fahrenheit. There have even been some instances of snow in the past during January and February. Thankfully, a good heating and cooling system can keep you comfortable year-round. But what temperature should you set your thermostat at? Learn more about the best indoor temperature for Austin, Texas, during each season.

Summer

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Austin temperature can get pretty hot in the summertime. You’ll often see 80-degree and 90-degree days on average. The temperatures can be extreme, but this is all to be expected when living in Central Texas. It’s common to have clear skies and muggy days, and the sun often beats down on you throughout the afternoon. You need to be smart with your thermostat to ensure that you won’t run up a massive energy bill. According to Del’s Heating & Air Conditioning, you can keep your thermostat at an average of 78 Fahrenheit to maintain a comfortable temperature at home without using up a lot of energy. If this isn’t cool enough for you, it’s best to talk to a professional about humidity control and see if you can lower your temperature without putting a strain on your cooling system.

Fall

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The fall brings some reprieve from the heat. It’s when 90-degree days finally start to come down to the low 80s and low 70s. The average temperatures in the fall can be anywhere between 85 degrees and 70 degrees depending on the month. The perfect thermostat setting for this time of year would be 75 degrees Fahrenheit. Autumn is a great time to visit Austin, Texas because it’s warm enough to enjoy recreational activities but cool enough to stay outside for longer periods of time without feeling too uncomfortable. If you’re staying inside, 75 degrees is just enough to stay cool without running up your energy bill.

Winter

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Winters in Austin are temperate in comparison to other parts of the country, but it can still get windy and cold. It’s quite rare to witness freezing temperatures in Central Texas but expect there to be some cloudy skies and even some storms. Temperatures can drop down to 48 degrees on average in the winter. The best thermostat setting would be 68 degrees Fahrenheit. Sleeping in this chillier temperature helps with restful sleep. It’s the lower end of a comfortable indoor temperature but still warm enough to feel cozy.

Spring

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Springtime in Austin is the absolute best. Picture the bluebonnets blooming and the weather starting to get warmer again. The average temperature during this time of year can vary between 58 and 74 degrees Fahrenheit. The perfect indoor temperature in Austin during this time of year would be around 72 degrees. It’s just high enough to start welcoming the warmer season without using up too much energy.

It’s important that you’re smart with your thermostat to lower your utility bills and prevent your heating and cooling system from any unneeded strain. Talk to a professional from Del’s Heating & Air Conditioning to ensure that you can beat the heat in the summertime and stay warm in the winter efficiently. You rely on your heating and cooling system to keep you cool and comfortable. So, you should contact a reliable service like Del’s Heating & Air Conditioning services to maintain your system throughout the year.

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The best kept travel secrets all in one place.

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